White's Chapel Cemetery

Grave Information

Like all pioneer cemeteries in the area, many of the earliest graves are unmarked. Some of the white marble markers from the last decades of the nineteenth century have begun to erode and are becoming illegible.

Unmarked/Open Graves

The unmarked or open markers are locations for which we do not have any information, and do not know if anyone is buried in that location. We are currently exploring options for techniques that are able to look below the surface to determine if a grave exists or not. Donations would be very helpful, as this is a costly endeavor and we are trying to work to afford this technology as soon as possible.

Paupers' Graves

We are currently seeking any available information to put correct names and dates on these spaces. There is no information on these graves. If you have any information about these graves, please contact us and provide any documentation you may have. We continue to work to discover what else is known by family and friends of White's Chapel Cemetery Association.

Sandstone Markers

The sandstone markers were placed to mark some graves, but due to the effects of nature the etchings of names and dates have been removed. We are currently seeking any available information to put correct names and dates on these markers.

White’s Chapel Methodist Church & White's Chapel Cemetery

The cemetery sits beside historic White’s Chapel Methodist Church but, the two have never been legally linked in any way.

The Whites Chapel Cemetery and Church were named for the Rev. Lewis M. White (c1837-1917), a circuit-riding Methodist preacher who served the Grapevine Circuit in 1873-1876.

A Texas Historical Marker of the grounds of the White’s Chapel United Methodist Church reads as follows;

WHITE’S CHAPEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

“FOUNDED BY SETTLERS WHO CAME BY WAGON TRAIN FROM DADE CO., GA 1871. EARLY SERVICES WERE IN HOME OF S. B. AUSTIN, THE LEADER. AUSTIN GAVE LAND FOR A CEMETERY AND CHURCH. A LOG MEETINGHOUSE WAS BUILT AND IN USE, FEB. 1872.

THIS WAS THE FIRST METHODIST CHURCH IN THIS VICINITY. CIRCUIT RIDER PREACHERS DREW CROWDS HERE FROM AS FAR AWAY AS 20 MILES. AT FIRST CALLED “OAK HILL” FOR HOME CHURCH IN GEORGIA, THIS WAS SOON RENAMED FOR A PERMANENT PASTOR, THE REV. MR. WHITE. THE COMMUNITY SCHOOL WAS HELD IN SUCCESSIVE CHURCH BUILDINGS UNTIL 1916 MANY SETTLERS REST IN NEARBY CEMETERY. (1971)